News

Textile students shine at Bradford Textile Society Awards

4 June 2014

Falmouth University student Charlotte Jankowski has been awarded first place in The Woolmark Company Award as part of the Bradford Textile Society Awards in the UK. To qualify for the award students must submit a woven or knitted fabric for apparel – including accessories, or a fabric for interiors – made from at least 60 per cent wool.

A sample of Miss Jankowski's design
Charlotte Jankowski has been awarded first place in The Woolmark Company Award as part of the Bradford Textile Society Awards. Miss Jankowski’s design was based on and inspired by designing base layer materials from Merino wool, and looking at how woven structures to trap air and heat could be used.

Miss Jankowski was awarded first place for her delicate use of colour, keen attention to detail in Merino wool knitwear developments and consideration of Merino knitwear for both the fashion and performance-wear markets. She has won a one-week placement with the Christopher Raeburn studio – a London label which frequently works with Merino wool and Cool Wool.

"My entry was based on and inspired by designing base layer materials from Merino wool, and looking at how I could use woven structures to trap air and heat,” she explains.

“I love working will wool and use it often; I like the fact that it is natural and is beautiful to work with. It was very unexpected when I won the prize but I am very excited and grateful about the chance to intern with Christopher Raeburn."

More than 700 students participated this year in the 20 sections of the Bradford Textile Society Awards, from universities and colleges across the UK, all vying for prize money of more than £11,000, trips to international textile trade exhibitions and work placements.

Bradford Textiles Society president Richard Poole says competitions such as this are crucial in ensuring that the textile industry remains strong and that emerging textile designers are supported in their education.

“To view all the designs is a real privilege at the judging stage and at the awards ceremony held at the spectacular Salt Mill,” Mr Poole said. “I hope the competition will continue to grow and bring more talent to the fore in future seasons.

“I am positive that students benefit from the briefs of each of the 20 or more sections, making a selection, investigating fibre, building techniques and developing ideas into a presentation and on time. It is a real discipline to learn to take forward into their further education or when moving into a career.

“This is a really a good news story, not just for the society and its aims to stimulate the talents of new designers, but to get these students and their designs into the market and put them on the ladder to greater success.”